Sleep disorder multiplies depression risk

Sleep-Texting Becoming An Alarming Trend, Experts Say

STORY HIGHLIGHTS 6% of men and 3% of women have received a sleep apnea diagnosis, study finds Seep apnea is a breathing disorder that causes frequent sleep disturbances Sleep disruption, particularly insomnia, can be a risk factor for developing depression Snoring, sometimes linked to sleep apnea, doesn’t appear to be associated with depression (Health.com) — People with sleep apnea, a breathing disorder that causes frequent sleep disturbances, often feel tired and unfocused during the day. But that may not be the only fallout: New research suggests the disorder also dramatically increases the risk of depression. Researchers at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) found that men with diagnosed sleep apnea are more than twice as likely as other men to exhibit signs of clinical depression, such as feeling hopeless and uninterested in everyday activities. The picture was even worse among women: A sleep apnea diagnosis increased the risk of depression symptoms fivefold. What’s more, the study suggests that sleep apnea is underdiagnosed. More than 80% of the people who reported classic symptoms such as snorting or gasping for breath on most nights of the week had never received an official diagnosis.
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://www.cnn.com/2012/03/30/health/conditions/sleep-apnea-depression/

Sleep Disorders in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

“Four o’clock in the morning, 3 o’clock in the morning — it would just be a sentence of jumbled-up stuff,” sleep-texter Megan told CBS New York . “I guess I got up and texted, and went back to bed, but I don’t remember it.” [ 10 Most Sleep-Deprived Careers ] Of course, sleep-texting can cause some embarrassing situations. Elizabeth Dowdell, a professor of nursing at Villanova University in Pennsylvania, has investigated the phenomenon of sleep-texting among college students. One young woman Dowdell studied had a habit of sending gushing, romantic texts to platonic friends.
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/08/23/sleep-texting-trend-health_n_3806641.html

When they performed sleep studies of 343 people meeting the Fukuda definition of ME/CFS, they found that 104 – nearly a third – had a primary sleep disorder that explained their symptoms, and thus didn’t have ME/CFS at all. A 1/3 misdiagnosis rate is enough of a reason to look more closely for sleep disorders. In those who didn’t have primary sleep disorders, just under 90% met the criteria for at least one measurable sleep problem. Researchers identified four different groups based on sleep abnormalities. They were: Group 1: Slower to get to sleep, delayed Rapid Eye Movement (REM), lower percentages of stage 2 and REM sleep; Group 2: More frequent awakenings; Group 3: Longer total sleep time, less delayed REM sleep, higher percentage of REM sleep, lower percentage of wake time; Group 4: Shortest total sleep time, highest percentage of wake time after sleep onset. Researchers concluded that doctors need to routinely screen for sleep disorders when considering an ME/CFS diagnosis, and that they should use sleep studies to identify sleep problems and tailor treatments to the specific groups. What kind of sleep problems do you have?
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://chronicfatigue.about.com/b/2013/07/19/sleep-disorders-in-chronic-fatigue-syndrome-2.htm

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